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Extremist literature, subversion of mainstream British mosques (Part 1)

November 26th, 2007 | Leave the first comment

Since the 7/7 bombings in Britain, British investigative researchers have been examining the kind of teaching and, in some cases, incitement against social cohesion that has been taking place in a number of mosques.

Do some mosques play a role in the radicalization of elements of the Muslim community? Various serious journalistic investigations have detailed what happened at the Finsbury Mosque, where Abu Hamza used to preach and at Birmingham’s Green Lane Mosque which was the subject of UK Channel 4 documentary in January of 2007. Concern was raised about possible hate speech directed against unbelievers, Jews, women and homosexuals.

In September 2007, the Times of London revealed that almost half of the mosques in the UK are under the control of the ‘hardline’ Deobandi sect, many of whose adherents, according to UK Muslim scholar Denis MacEoin and Times reporters, “preach a message of antipathy for and opposition to western society”. This was followed by a published study from the Centre for Social Cohesion about the presence of extremist Islamic literature in publicly-funded libraries in the UK.

Policy Exchange, a respected UK think tank, decided to undertake its own research of teachings available at mainstream mosques using Muslim researchers from both South Asia and Arab ancestry, over a two-year period (2006 and 2007). They visited and frequently spent extensive periods of time at some 100 mosques and schools across Britain. Their work, which included review of texts in English, Urdu or Arabic, was cross-checked and analyzed by Professor Denis MacEoin, a Cambridge PhD in Persian (Islamic) Studies and currently Royal Literary Fund Fellow at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Professor Neal Robinson, who holds the Islamic Chair at Sogang University in Seoul, wrote the Preface and emphasized that he had personally reviewed the passages drawn upon and “that my choice of passages would have been much the same as theirs.” He continues (the rationale for my own detailed recitation of these points) that “…there is no desire to impugn Muslims: that certainly was not the aim. Rather this report should be seen as an effort to force an honest reappraisal of the some of the things that are said and done in the name of Islam. It is about the abuse and misuse of that religion by those who would propagate an agenda infused with hatred, misogyny, violence and antisemitism.”

The findings speak for themselves. I shall summarize some of the key ones from Professor MacEoin’s report.

1. Radical material was found in 25% of the institutions surveyed. 48% of the total were in English, more accessible to the general public. ‘What is more worrying, according to the report, is that these are among the best-funded and most dynamic institutions in Muslim Britain…some of which are held up as mainstream bodies’.

2. In the twin concepts of loyalty and enmity, individual Muslims must not only feel deep affection for and identity with fellow believers…“but individual Muslims must also feel an abhorrence for non-believers, hypocrites, heretics and all that is deemed ‘un-Islamic”.

3. “Western society in particular is deemed to be sinful, corrosive and corrupting for Muslims. Western values — particularly concerning the position and rights of women and in the realm of sexuality — are rejected as inimical to Islam.’
4. ‘On occasion, the attitude of deep-rooted antipathy…can descend into exhortations to violence… usually the literature does not go that far, but it is no less problematic for that. Without condoning or inciting terrorism, portions of it can sometimes provide a cultural hinterland — couched in religious terms — into which those who encourage and conduct violence can move…’

5. ‘The hate and separatist literature found in some mosques and reported in the study is of a wholly different order from that which one would expect to find in mainstream religious institutions of other faiths in this country today.’

6. The report also exposes some of the forces vying for control of Britain’s mosques:…”With regard to the Wahhabites, it is clear that the influence of Saudi Arabia is both powerful and malign. Much of the material featured is connected in some way with the Saudi kingdom…for this reason, there needs to be a proper audit of the costs and benefits of the Saudi-UK relationship…”

7. ‘The concept of emigration demands that the believer undergo a literal and spiritual withdrawal from the contamination of surrounding society…there is an insistence on regarding Muslims as the superior of all others…such views inevitably create practical problems for Muslims living in the West.’

8. ‘Extremist literature enjoys a potency through its availability in prestigious sites of Islamic religious instruction across the UK. This makes it a major impediment to efforts by Muslims to integrate into mainstream British society.’

Some examples of key quotes:

• “In the beginning of the twentieth century, a movement for the freedom of women was launched with the basic objective of driving women towards aberrant ways. This was patronized by Jews and Christians who made known that their ambition was to lead astray the aliens who were very devoted to their religion so that they keep away from their religion and feel shy to describe its salient features…” from a publication called  Women Who Deserve to go to Hell.

• “The Jews and the Christians are the enemies of the Muslim, and they will never be pleased with the Muslims…” Al-Hadith-3rd Grade Intermediate: The King Fahad Academy, London.

• “Protocols of the Elders of Zion…there is a great deal of evidence which proves its existence …we can summarize the content of the protocols with these points: 3) Zionism believes in the corruption and elimination of the current governing European regimes 4) Controlling of media, propaganda, and newspaper venues…tempting the masses with physical pleasures and spreading pornography”-1st Grade text High School, The King Fahad Academy, London

This entry was posted on Monday, November 26th, 2007 at 11:02 am and is filed under Antisemitism, Radical Islamism, Reasonable Accommodation, Values and Principles. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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